Notifiable Disease Incidence in New York State

February 29, 2024
communicable diseases disease incidence epidemiology public health New York State


Published: June 13, 2023
Updated: February 29, 2024 at 04:52PM


Welcome

Welcome to my personal data science website, where I focus on epidemiology and public health. On this page, I present data analyses on communicable disease incidence in New York State. The data used in these analyses are obtained from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) through the data.CDC.gov open data platform. The latest data are provisional and subject to updates.

I updated this page on a weekly basis.

Data Overview

The data presented on this page are weekly cases of selected infectious national notifiable diseases in the United States, including New York State. These cases are reported to the National Notifiable Diseases Surveillance System (NNDSS). The NNDSS data reported by the 50 states, New York City, the District of Columbia, and the U.S. territories are collated and published weekly as numbered tables by the CDC.

It’s important to note that the case counts listed in the tables are provisional and may change as additional information becomes available. State health departments report cases to the CDC for weekly publication, and ongoing revisions and delayed reporting can impact the numbers listed in later weeks. For a comprehensive understanding of interpreting these data, please refer to the Guide to Interpreting Provisional and Finalized NNDSS Data.

How to Use These Data

The data are visualized in different formats on this page, including: a heat map, a bar graph, and longitudinal trend graphs.

The bar graph shows the cumulative number of cases of each disease that were reported to the CDC. This graph illustrates disease burden and allows for comparisons between different diseases.

The heatmap, on the other hand, displays the weeks during which any case of a specific disease was reported to the CDC. The heatmap uses red color to indicate the weeks with any reported cases and blue color to indicate the weeks with no reported cases. The y-axis of the heatmap represents the different diseases, while the x-axis represents the weeks. This visualization helps identify the presence or absence of reported cases for each disease over time.

The longitudinal trend graphs, displayed as line graphs, show the incidence of each disease over time. Each disease is represented by a separate line on the graph, allowing you to observe changes in disease occurrence and identify any seasonal patterns or long-term trends.

Why Are These Data Important?

These data play a crucial role in monitoring and understanding communicable diseases in New York State. By tracking the incidence of notifiable diseases, public health officials can identify outbreaks, assess the impact of interventions, and allocate resources effectively. These data inform public health policies and interventions aimed at preventing and controlling the spread of infectious diseases.

What Do These Data Show?

The longitudinal trend graphs provide a visual representation of disease incidence over time for each specific communicable disease. The line on each respective graph represents a different disease, allowing you to see the fluctuations and trends in disease occurrence. By analyzing these graphs, you can gain insights into the seasonality, patterns, and changes in disease incidence over time.

The heatmap, with its red and blue colors, allows you to identify the weeks when any cases of a specific disease were reported (red) and when no cases were reported (blue). By observing the heatmap, you can visualize the temporal distribution of disease occurrence and identify any clusters or periods of increased or decreased disease activity.

What Do These Data Not Show?

While these data provide valuable information on the incidence of notifiable diseases, it’s important to note their limitations. The data only include cases that are reported to the CDC and may not capture the complete picture of disease incidence in New York State. Some cases may go unreported or may not meet the criteria for being included in the notifiable diseases list.

Additionally, the data are provisional and subject to updates. As more information becomes available and reporting is finalized, the case counts may change. Therefore, it’s crucial to interpret these data with caution and consider them as a snapshot of disease incidence at a specific point in time.

Implications for Public Health Practice

These data have significant implications for public health practice in New York State. By analyzing the trends and patterns in disease incidence, public health professionals can identify priority areas for intervention, allocate resources effectively, and develop targeted strategies to prevent and control communicable diseases. The insights gained from these data can inform decision-making, guide surveillance efforts, and contribute to evidence-based public health policies.

Thank you for visiting my website and exploring the data analyses on communicable disease incidence in New York State. I hope these insights contribute to your understanding of the public health landscape and support efforts to improve population health.



Cumulative Cases

Graphs Prepared By: Isaac H. Michaels, MPH
Data Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


Disease Cumulative Cases
Chlamydia trachomatis infection 120647
Gonorrhea 45146
Campylobacteriosis 9479
Shigellosis 5187
Salmonellosis (excluding Salmonella Typhi infection and Salmonella Paratyphi infection) 4732
Giardiasis 4107
Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Anaplasma phagocytophilum infection 3343
Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages, Confirmed 2799
Syphilis, Primary and secondary 2200
Babesiosis 1602
Tuberculosis 1030
Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) 953
Legionellosis 946
Pertussis 819
Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, All ages, all serotypes 765
Cryptosporidiosis 716
Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichia chaffeensis infection 356
Hepatitis C, acute, Confirmed 282
Hepatitis B, chronic, Confirmed 219
Hepatitis C, chronic, Probable 205
Malaria 196
Rabies, Animal 187
Invasive pneumococcal disease, all ages, Probable 174
Hepatitis C, chronic, Confirmed 152
Listeriosis, Confirmed 151
Hepatitis, A, acute 144
Cyclosporiasis 143
Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 years, Confirmed 118
Vibriosis (any species of the family Vibrionaceae, other than toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139), Probable 105
Hepatitis, B, acute 82
Meningococcal disease, All serogroups 81
Meningococcal disease, Unknown serogroup 77
Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, Age <5 years, Unknown serotype 55
Mpox 53
Vibriosis (any species of the family Vibrionaceae, other than toxigenic Vibrio cholerae O1 or O139), Confirmed 50
Salmonella Typhi infection 39
Dengue virus infections, Dengue 34
Hepatitis C, acute, Probable 31
Mumps 28
Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome 26
Listeriosis, Probable 18
Arboviral diseases, West Nile virus disease 15
Vancomycin-intermediate Staphylococcus aureus 15
Hepatitis A, Confirmed 14
Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Undetermined ehrlichiosis/anaplasmosis 13
Brucellosis 12
Q fever, Total 12
Hepatitis C, perinatal infection 11
Salmonella Paratyphi infection 10
Influenza-associated pediatric mortality 7
Q fever, Acute 7
Toxic shock syndrome (other than Streptococcal) 7
Arboviral diseases, Chikungunya virus disease 6
Invasive pneumococcal disease, age <5 years, Probable 6
Tularemia 6
Q fever, Chronic 5
Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, Age <5 years, Non-b serotype 4
Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, Age <5 years, Serotype b 4
Ehrlichiosis and Anaplasmosis, Ehrlichia ewingii infection 3
Hepatitis B, acute 3
Leptospirosis 3
Meningococcal disease, Serogroup B 3
Botulism, Infant 2
Haemophilus influenzae, invasive disease, Age <5 years, Nontypeable 2
Hansen’s disease 2
Hemolytic uremic syndrome post-diarrheal 2
Hepatitis C, perinatal, Confirmed 2
Arboviral diseases, Powassan virus disease 1
Botulism, Other (wound & unspecified) 1
Chancroid 1
Hepatitis B, acute, Confirmed 1
Hepatitis B, perinatal infection 1
Meningococcal disease, Serogroups ACWY 1
Rubella 1
Tetanus 1
Anthrax 0
Arboviral diseases, Eastern equine encephalitis virus disease 0
Arboviral diseases, Jamestown Canyon virus disease 0
Arboviral diseases, La Crosse virus disease 0
Arboviral diseases, St. Louis encephalitis virus disease 0
Arboviral diseases, Western equine encephalitis virus disease 0
Botulism, Foodborne 0
Candida auris, clinical 0
Candida auris, screening 0
Carbapenemase-Producing Organisms (CPO), Total 0
Carbapenemase-producing carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae 0
Cholera 0
Coccidioidomycosis 0
Coccidioidomycosis, Confirmed 0
Coccidioidomycosis, Probable 0
Coccidioidomycosis, total 0
Cronobacter invasive infection, infants, Confirmed 0
Cronobacter invasive infection, infants, Probable 0
Dengue virus infections, Dengue-like illness 0
Dengue virus infections, Severe dengue 0
Hantavirus infection, non-hantavirus pulmonary syndrome 0
Hantavirus pulmonary syndrome 0
Hepatitis B, acute, Probable 0
Hepatitis B, chronic, Probable 0
Hepatitis B, perinatal, Confirmed 0
Measles, Imported 0
Measles, Indigenous 0
Melioidosis 0
Meningococcal disease, Other serogroups 0
Novel Influenza A virus infections 0
Plague 0
Poliomyelitis, paralytic 0
Poliovirus infection, nonparalytic 0
Psittacosis 0
Rabies, Human 0
Rubella, congenital syndrome 0
Severe acute respiratory syndrome-associated coronavirus disease 0
Smallpox 0
Syphilis, Congenital 0
Trichinellosis 0
Vancomycin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus 0
Varicella disease 0
Varicella morbidity 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Chapare virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Ebola virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Guanarito virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Junin virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Lassa virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Lujo virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Machupo virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Marburg virus 0
Viral hemorrhagic fevers, Sabia virus 0
Yellow fever 0
Zika virus disease, non-congenital 0

Table Prepared By:__ Isaac H. Michaels, MPH
Data Source: U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention


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